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Education Section: Did you know...?

 

What are TI's biggest vessels?

TI’s four biggest vessels are the TI Africa, TI Asia, TI Europe and TI Oceania. Classified as V-Plus vessels, they measure 380 metres from bow to stern and are 68 metres wide.

 

  • A V-Plus standing on its end is as high as the Empire State Building in New York, nearly four times the height of Big Ben in London and is four fifths of the size of the Petronas Towers in Kuala Lumpur.

  • A V-Plus is longer from bow to stern than golf legend Tiger Woods’ longest drive.

  • The deck area of a V-Plus is approximately 25,850 square metres – this is  the same as three and a half football (soccer) pitches.

 

  • The V-Plus vessels each have a DWT of 440,000MT – this gives a cargo carrying capacity of 3.1 million barrels of oil, or 500 million litres (865 million pints).

 

How much oil does the world consume?

The world consumes 80 million barrels of oil per day. It takes 25 V-Plus vessels to carry this amount of oil.

 

The breakdown of the major consumers is as follows:

 

  • USA consumes 20.7 million barrels of oil per day
  • China consumes 7 million barrels of oil per day
  • UK consumes 1.8 million barrels of oil per day

 

 

Source: BP 2005

 

In 2006, TI delivered more than 87 million tonnes of crude oil, or 611 million barrels. In doing so, the fleet travelled 4.41 million nautical miles or over 8 million kilometres (5 million statute miles). This is equivalent to 10.5 roundtrips to the moon.

 

The UK consumes 6,000 million litres (10,500 million pints) of milk each year. This amount could be carried on just 12 V-Plus vessels. The US consumes enough milk yearly to fill 48 V-Plus vessels.

 

A regular trade for a V-Plus is between the Arabian Gulf and the US Gulf. This is a voyage of 9,500 nautical miles, or 17,712 kilometres. A V-Plus takes 26.5 days to complete such a voyage. A car travelling at 100 km/h would take 7.4 days to travel the same distance.

 

 

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